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>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
military targets overnight. a spokesman suggests u.s. combat operations may have peaked. the u.s. role is in the no-fly zone. it's moving from action to patrolling phase today. libyan handlers took journalists to see damage inside gadhafi's compound. that happened earlier today. a possible missile wrecked a four-story building. gadhafi was not the target. >>> defense secretary robert gates arrived in russia today as that country's prime minister turned up the heat. putin ripped the united states for what he called a steady trend of intervention abroad. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition and be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition. >> arab league president is toning down his criticism of the coalition attacks. he met with u.n. secretary moon in cairo today saying he's committed to the u.n. resolution on libya. yesterday, he complained the campaign was too broad and civilians were killed. >>> libya freed four new york times journalists today. the four cro
intervention in libya diplomatic preure is growing. the u.s., britain and france warned gaddafi to hold the advance and pull back on other cities. this comes on the heels of a decision to propose a no-fly zone. gaddafi has declared a cease- fire but rebels say government forces continued their assault. >> for these rebels the no-fly zone cannot come soon enough. the resolution gives me new hope. >> there for libya has decided on an immediate cease-fire and stoppage of all operations. >> that announcement has been received with skepticism. >> the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls to stop violence against his own people has left us with no other choice. >> the international community will not be tricked by the libyan regime. the international community will verify strict compliance with the resolution. >> at the nato headquarters preparations were made to pave the way for operations to begin this weekend. >> we now havthe power and legal basis to stop. that is
international airport. the shooting involved a u.s. military shuttle bus. someone got on the bus and started shooting. two are confirmed dead. we believe they're two u.s. soldiers. one person has been taken into custody. again we know two are killed. it is reported that those are two u.s. soldiers. the incident is over, the airport is operating as usual. this is out of frankfurt. as soon as we get more detail, we get to fred out of berlin. >>> the u.s. supreme court is reaffirming the first amendment right to free speech even if it is painful and ugly. in an 8-1 decision, they say a kansas church can push their message outside military funle rals. jeffrey toobin is on the phone with us. jeff, let's start off here, is this a surprise to you the court's decision? because this is a case that everybody's been watching. >> reporter: it's a pain until awful case and the westboro baptist church is an insuggelt religion everywhere. but the decision is not a surprise. these statements in this context, nondisruptive statements about politics, are at the heart of what the first amendment is all about e
and what this could mean for u.s. forces. we're also standing by for a statement from the secretary of state hillary clinton. we're also standing by for a statement from the nato secretary-general in brussels. stand by for that. >>> moammar gadhafi is still on the attack, on this the sixth night of pounding by the coalition forces. an explosion and anti-aircraft fire echos in tripoli just a little while ago. could the outrageous failure at reagan happen again? the fallout, the danger at two planes coming in for a landing radioed the control tower and got no answer. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the breaking news. the united states may be closer to giving up its lead role in the fight to protect lickance from gadhafi's forces. right now there's new uncertainty, though, about a tentative deal for nato to take command of the mission. we have lots of questions about how this might play out and how it might affect the overall goal of seeing gadhafi go away. the secretary of state hillary clinton will make a statement a little more that an hour from no
from u.s. and british ships and submarines struck more than 20 intergreated air defense systems and other air defense facilities ashore. >> geraldo: this is a fox news alert. today, after a painful but ultimately successful week long effort to enlist international support in an operation named odyssey dawn the united states military led the air and naval forces of two of our closest allies, france and britain in launching a massive attack which we are told has already severely disabled the air defenses of the dictator who refuses to stop his vicious assault on his own people. hi, everybody. i'm geraldo rivera. welcome to our two hour special report on the day the libyan civil war became our fight. the offensive to protect libya's people from their own government and ultimately take down the madman who has plagued us for more than four decades began saturday when french jets soared over qaddafi's forces besieging the rebel held city of benghazi, reportedly taking out four of qaddafi's tanks. the initial french action was soon dwarfed by a huge salvo of cruz missiles. 11 114 fired
pushing back against mounting pressure to impose a military no-fly zone over libya. why one u.s. official says it's, quote, an extraordinary complex situation. plus, gas prices soaring as the crisis in libya intensifies. is it time now for the united states to tap into its emergency oil reserve to soften the blow at the pump? and an estimated 18,000 refugees crowded into a tent city near the libyan border as a full-blown humanitarian crisis is unfolding. lots happening right here today in "the situation room." pendingo much money on printing. i'd like to put you in charge of cutting costs. calm down. i know that it is not your job. what i'm saying... excuse me? alright, fine. no, you don't have to do it. ok? [ male announcer ] notre dame knows it's better for xerox to control its printing costs. so they can focus on winning on and off the field. [ manager ] are you sure i can't talk -- ok, no, i get it. [ male announcer ] with xerox, you're ready for real business. and go everywhere. to help revitalize a neighborhood in massachusetts, restore a historic landmark in harlem, fund a local bu
the next day and then you're not putting up any forces, you're criticizing the u.s. for foreign military intervention. so they want to make sure the arabs are along with them so then they can't be blamed later on. so that's -- >> finish your point there. >> so that's why we've been seeing secretary clinton really in the last week reaching out to those arab leaders saying, we need you with us. you say you're going to -- you say you support this, you say you want us to influence the no-fly zone, what are you going to do to stand with us to do this? this is really extraordinary. an arab league authorizing force against one of its members. as we've said, it's really a unique since the gulf war in 1991. >> unique in many ways, but no matter what, will there still be some elements in the arab world who will see this as still being operated, still being controlled behind the scenes at least in large part by western powers, appearing once again to be exerting some kind of military action in another arab country? >> well, we've seen -- that's why this is really unique. because nobody has
are considering other ways to help those suffering in libya. hillary clinton says the u.s. military might have a role to play, such as getting supplies to where they're needed. the u.s. secretary of state acknowledged direct intervention would face major opposition. the arab league says it's against any foreign interference. >>> now, some people taking part in the uprising against colonel gadhafi say they want western forces to give support, to prevent more attacks by government planes. some politicians in washington say the u.s. should do just that. but the defense secretary told congress it wouldn't be easy. >> if it's ordered, we can do it. but the really is, and people, there's a lot of, frankly, loose talk about some of these military options. and let's just call a spade a spade. a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. to destroy the air defenses. that's the way you'd do a no-fly zone. and then you can fly planes around the country and not worry about our guys being shot down. but that's the way it starts. >> i'm not endorsing it. >> no, i understand that. but it also requires more
>>> airport ambush. two u.s. airmen are dead, and two more wounded in germany. the suspect is now being questioned by authorities. >>> family horror. a 12-year-old colorado boy is in custody, accused of killing his parents. >>> and deadline day for pro football. the contract between the nfl players union and team owners the contract between the nfl players union and team owners expires at midnight. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. investigators in germany are trying to figure out why a gunman opened fire on a busload of u.s. airmen, killing two, and seriously wounding two others. it happened yesterday at the frankfurt airport. the suspect is an employee at that airport. charlie d'agata has the latest. >> reporter: the two u.s. airmen killed wednesday had not even made it to the battlefield. they were with 11 other military personnel on this bus outside the frankfurt, germany, airport, when the gunman opened fire. police say the suspect, 21-year-old arid uka is a citizen of kosovo, an airport employee and a devout muslim
there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a l
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
of the stricken reactor is at the fukushima plant. radiation continues to spread from the site. u.s. engineers and others are explaining their options of containing the leak. >> in the small village 40 kilometers northeast of fukushima, while outside detroit exclusion zone, the people living here thought they were safe -- northeast of fukushima, well east -- outside of the exclusion zone. >> this has exceeded the data. >> the latest news from fukushima also offers no grounds for optimism. yvette tb's do not know when or even if they will be able to return home -- in evacuees -- the evacuees do not know. >> we do not know when the situation will normalize, and we do not think there will be a future for us in the city. >> operator tepco has decided to decommission four of the reactors. filling them up may be necessary. >> government and experts are considering but these four buildings at the fukushima-dai- ichi plant to stop the spread of the substances. >> a they will spray it with a synthetic resin to try to prevent radioactive dust from being blown away or being watched to see. in a refugee c
. correspondent amy kellogg tells us what happened. >> reporter: two u.s. airmen were shot dead on a bus, transporting security forces team at frank further airport in germany -- frankfurt airport in germany. on their way to support overseas contingency operation. >> i'm saddened and outraged by the attack that took lives of two americans and wounded two others. i think the american people are united in expressing our gratitude for the service for folks who were lost. >> reporter: the airmen killed were based at the royal air force base in england, the largest u.s. air force base in the united kingdom, where there are three squadron of f-15 fighters the motive is unknown. the u.s. authorities believe the shooter is now in german customer yelled alaw akbar at the attack. they say his family comes from a flashpoint town in cos sew vo. it was a u.s. -led nato mission that liberated cos sew vo from serbia aggression. >> it's a terrible incident and germany will do everything possible to find out what happened. >> reporter: republican congressman from pennsylvania chairman of homeland securit
to the airport there. he is going to join us for the very latest. again two u.s. service members among those who were killed and injured in an attack there at the airport in germany. we will bring that to you in just a short time. also we want to bring you up to date on fast moving developments. the libyan military has dropped three bombs and you see it on the map, brega. the opposition may control the town managing to drive out libyan troops. that's not the only place to see military action there. military camps on the outskirts. first we want to tell you about an aerial bombing has led some to propose the united states consider imposing a no-fly zone over the country. but the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said he called this a complex operation. one of those is a uss -- you are looking here at a photo of the ship from today as it went through the canal. near the region. secretary of defense, robert gates has said the repositioning is to provide humanitarian relief and the capen't for emergency evaguations. let me tell you about the capabilities. it has the ability to transport troops,
to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
. >> in an overwhelming majority, the u.s. supreme court has ruled that a fundamentalist churches with anti-gay messages that protests outside military generals arc -- military funerals are protected under the first amendment. snyder died in a non-combat related vehicle accident in iraq. they picketed outside his md. funeral in 2006. the marines father reacted to the high court's decision. >> we found out today that we can no longer bury our dead in the cemetery with dignity. >> the kansas based church has protested outside hundreds of military funerals. he filed a lawsuit accusing the church of the intensely inflicting emotional distress. the marines father initially won a multimillion-dollar settlement, which was brought out on appeal. the lawyer for the church said, that they expected this outcome. >> this is a victory for the first amendment. >> his father showed frustration that the supreme court's will never have to deal with what many grieving military families will now face in the future. >> these justices do not have to worry about this because the westboro baptist church will never get anywher
of the day. u.s. forces will nuteralize the aircraft of the libyans and other people are not going to commit to the ground and i fear al-gaddafi's forces are going to prevail over the long term unless we find a better way to support the resistance on the ground. >> neil: cornel. we are watching the opening statement. that is watch because i don't understand portuguese. i apologize . the other bad news, is no one understands portuguese. >> neil: i -- know. this is the longest opening statement on the part of a foreign leader in the history of man. but the president is down there and we are told hillary clinton secretary of state did brief him on these talks going on with the french president nicholas sarkozy and many are saying that hillary clinton are sounding the clarion call and leading that in the administration, what do you think of that? >> it is apparent france is taking the leading role. they demonstrated they are committed to doing something and we hope that our european alleys and alleys in the africa will end up being the ones and our egyptian friends and the ones who are providing
, however, as you noted, because even amid this crisis, the u.s. has had some contact with libyan officials and that has been critical in terms of helping to get americans and others out of the tripoli safely. so if you were to cut off all of those ties, that could put some of the remaining americans, obviously, in some jeopardy. why would the u.s. then take such a dramatic step and cut off all diplomatic ties? because that was a big deal for colonel gadhafi a few years ago when the george w. bush administration finally said he was no longer a rogue state, that they would recognize him diplomatally because he came forward with his weapons program. if all of a sudden the u.s. cut off all ties, that would he remove even more if there is a shred of legitimacy left for gadhafi and remove it once and for all. that would be the pressure point because that is something he has craved so long is have some legitimacy on the world stage. of course, given what ben is reporting and given what is happening on the ground right now, it's doubtful he has any legitimacy but the u.s. is looking for any lever
and nato enter libya. >> woodruff: plus we look at military options for the u.s. and others, including establishing a no-fly zone over the north african nation. >> warner: marcia coyle gives us the latest from the supreme court, including today's 8-1 ruling upholding the free speech rights of protesters at military funerals. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the controversy surrounding dozens of no fishing zones off the coast of california. >> california is establishing dozens of protected areas in the ocean, but the problem is there aren't enough game wardens to enforce the rules. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks to libyan-born u.s. poet khaled mattawa about life in libya under qaddafi and today's uprising. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institu
launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striking back fro
holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grade school. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: in 1968, as whaling continued worldwide, the first recordings of humpback songs were relqb:qb. ( whale singing ) public reaction mud to international bans. whale populations began to recover. at pacific life, the whale symbolizes what is possible if people stop and think about the future. help protect your future with pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. ♪ ♪çç moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates founda
council resolution 1973. u.s. and british forces launched 12 tomahawk land attack missiles, targeting command-and-control facilities service to skirt -- a scud facility and a re-attack of the previous air site. forces from france, spain, italy, denmark, and united kingdom, with missions to sustain a no-fly zone in benghazi, to protect civilians from attack, and conduct further reconnaissance. coalition naval vessels sustained maritime controls toward u.n. security council resolution, to prevent the illegal shipments of arms to and from libya. iss our actions are generally achieving the intended objections. we have not observed a libyan military aircraft operating since the beginning of operations. the naval vessels have returned to or remain in port. cents initial strikes, no regime long range air defense radars. air attacks have succeeded in stopping regime ground forces from advancing to benghazi and we are now seeing ground forces moving southward from benghazi. we will, of course, watch these ground force movements closely. through a variety of reports, we know regime ground force
that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest: sure. first of all, i think it's really important in terms of context of my work, entalk about unintended consequences, good intentions, but yields bad outcomes. what i've done in the book is focus on the three key ingredients. those are capital, basically money, labor, which is basically the work force, and then fina
are willing to die for him, says the u.s. will face a bloody war if they intervene. bill: jonathan hunt, live at the libyan-tunisian border, hello there. >> reporter: good morning to you. colonel gadhafi appears to be as defiant as ever this morning. in a speech to his people, marking the 34th anniversary of the peoples' congress and in front of what appears to be a hand-picked audience, he said that he and his supporters will, quote, fight to the last man and to the last woman. he railed against intervention, warning the united states and others not to troy to intervene in the situation in libya. he says he and his people -- [inaudible] >> [broken speech] >> he is building -- he is fire up supporters by implying this is all an international plot to oust him. meanwhile he says al-qaeda is prompting some of the violence against him. >> [inaudible] >> -- united states and al-qaeda combined, but this is the reality world in which colonel gadhafi appears to live right now. there is also violence in several cities right now. the pro ga-- >> [broken speech] >> here on the border we still have a gro
reportedly near or on a bus carrying u.s. soldiers at the frankfurt airport. amy kellogg is following this breaking story live from london. amy. >> reporter: yes, we're trying to piece together the information. we're getting it at this point various press agencies on the ground, pretty much now the frankfurt police and the u.s. military, who are investigating this. two people dead, we understand, one, a u.s. soldier, when allegedly a 21-year-old shooter from kosovo opened fire on a bus, carrying u.s. soldiers, at the frankfurt airport. now, this just happened, so, again, we're just piecing together this information. we believe it's one soldier killed, and the driver of the bus, and then two people taken to the hospital. you know the airport base, the medical center, which is part of the u.s. military s. based very close to frankfurt and that is the biggest u.s. military hospital outside the united states. it's where soldiers coming from iraq and afghanistan are treated. again, we don't have information about the actual soldiers on that bus, where they were going, to or from, but we kn
's decision in libya and what role the u.s. has welcome to "washington journal" this friday, march 25. in "the baltimore sun," -- nato to take the lead. what do you think about the nato and u.s. role in libya? the numbers to call -- send us your tweets and we will read them. coverage of the nato-u.s. relationship in libya. allied forces hit a libyan jet that ventured into the air. taking a look at "the washington post" coverage. they are starting out with "obama pressed for clarity over libya." coming from both parties in congress, as well as others, to get some sense of where the u.s. is going with this. let's get to the phones and hear what you think. lydia in maryland. democrats' line. caller: i think it is great he is turning over command of the no-fly zone to nato. he said the united states would not be in the lead and it is about time it takes responsibility. more of the gulf states are contributing airplanes to the no-fly zone. i saw last night that night thatqatar, united arab emirates, contributing planes to the no- fly zone. that is great. they can do that. since the united states do
will be allowed to continue. the u.s. supreme court ruled the church is protected under the first amendment. the sting of that decision felt right here in maryland. we have the response from a father who fought the westboro baptist church to the highest court in honor of his son, a u.s. marine killed in iraq. >> today marks the fifth anniversary that matthew snyder was killed in iraq. it's a difficult day for his dad only made harder by yesterday's supreme court ruling. this legal fight began about five years ago when members of the westboro baptist church showed up at the funeral of al snyder's son. matthew was killed in iraq. church members shoutedded their hateful message that matthew died because of this country's acceptance of homosexuality. the supreme court ruled the first amendment protects westboro baptist church's right to protest which now means the church has a license to picket funerals no matter how hurtful their message is. a member of that church says the ruling will intensify their picketing. al snyder says the most painful part is he'll have to pay westboro baptist church
today, and alleged gunman is in custody 24 hours after the attack that left two u.s. troops dead and another two wounded. the suspect opened fire and a bus full of air men outside the frankfurt airport and there are new signs that terrorism was the reason behind it. >> authorities say the gunmen who was a muslim rates in germany has confessed to an act of terror, her assault on friendly soil. >> i am saddened and outraged by this attack. we will spare no effort in learning how this outrageous act took place. >> the bullet that killed the driver came through this window, striking a bus carrying more than one dozen u.s. air man coming from an airbase in england and route to ramstein airbase in germany. authorities say the gunman pulled out a semi-automatic weapon and began firing over and over shouting god is great in arabic. the shooter got off nine rounds killing two arabs and critically wounding two others. one is gun jammed, the gunmen made his way to the terminal but was tackled by a u.s. airman and german police. >> german chancellor angela merkel said she is dismayed and pro
forces today, and the regime is offering a reward, almost half a million u.s., for the capture of a top opposition figure. we have new cnn video coming in from ras lanuf where rebels with fighting to hold their ground. government troops are using planes and heavy artillery to try to retake the eastern oil city. in the western city of zawiya, libyan television showed government supporters cheering in the streets today, but there are now unconfirmed reports that rebels have retaken the main square there. after days of heavy fighting, it's almost impossible to get through to anyone in zawiya for any independent confirmation of what's going on there. today gadhafi is also sending a new warning to the united states and its allies as they consider imposing a no-fly zone over libya. he promises that all libyans will fight back against what he calls an act of aggression and an attempt to control libya's oil. >> translator: it will be clear aggression. it will also be clear that the intentions are to control libya's oil, choke libya's liberty, land and people. all of the libyans carry weapons so
strike on a key oil port. investigators in germany believe the fatal gun attack on two u.s. airmen in frankfurt airport was politically motivated. and and ecb interest rate hike is on the horizon as the bank frets over mounting inflation. ♪ >> france and britain say there will support a no-fly zone over libya if the situation there gets worse. the french foreign ministry says the two countries plan to do everything they can to increase pressure on moammar gaddafi. the libyan leader once more airstrikes on the rebels thursday morning. witnesses say warplanes bombed an oil port. the rebels have appealed for outside help, asking for u.n.- backed airstrikes to end the conflict. >> in the battle zone town, rebels are burying the dead. thousands turned out to join the funeral procession. there are mercenaries hired by gaddafi. they're preparing for new attacks on their town, a strategic seaport with key oil facilities, after recent air strikes, a ground attack by gaddafi's troops appears imminent. >> we're ready to face gaddafi's men. our scouts are telling us they are headed this way.
: president obama gets the u.s. military involved in the libya situation and tells gaddafi he must go. we'll look at the citizen soldiers trying to hold off the libyan army. what last year's oil spill is still doing to the gulf coast. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. president obama again called on libyan leader muammar gaddafi to step down. on the ground in libya, mutenist army unit helping to secure a key oil instalelation after rebels repelled attack from gaddafi loyalist. they ruled out any negotiations with gaddafi and the international criminal court said they will investigate gaddafi and his sons for possible crimes against humanity. we begin coverage with white house correspondent mike emanuel. >> reporter: as liberal forces fight the regime at strategic joint conference, at news conference with mexican president felipe calderon, president obama called out the libyan leader by name, a new approach. >> let me be very unambiguous about this. colonel gaddafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his countr
of the border there are thousands of u.s. gun dealers. nearly all the weapons taken out of the hands of criminals there come from the u.s. just two months ago, secretary of state hillary clinton visited the country, and announced a half billion dollar aid package to help mexico fight organized crime. that said, this visit, well it does come just 16 days after an american immigration and customs agent was shot on a provincial mexican highway. all right. so mexican president calderon met this trip, met this trip with business leaders who are concerned about recent drug violence. mexico happens to be our third largest trade partner after canada, and then china. and it is the second largest market for american products. and again, i want to tell you you're looking live at the east room at the white house where we expect this joint news conference to begin at any moment and we're going to bring it to you. we're covering all angles on this, you know that. joining me live from washington is cnn's wolf blitzer. cnn's senior political analyst gloria borger, and from the north lawn the senior
after the killing of u.s. immigration agent in mexico. american agents cannot legally carry guns south of the border. at today's news conference near president said that should change. each points out the americans are there in a support role and not as law enforcement officers as well. both presidents promised to do more to protect u.s. agents working in mexico. >> i assure you that we will be examining all our procedures and protocols in terms of how our agents travel throughout mexico and we will be working in close contact with mexican law enforcement, who i'm sure will have important advice in terms of how we operate in that region. >> shepard: and now there has been a gruesome killing on this side of the border. experts call it a first for mexican drug lords. and cops say the cartels are trying to send a very clear message right here in the united states. that message and the rest of the day's news coming up from the journalists of fox news tonight on "the fox report." are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? the experts at imperial
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